Tema Oficial Luiji's Retrohackingmania (The Missing Link)

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Air Luigi

Air Luigi

Iluh Minaoh
Fortianitas
1.190
RE: Luiji's Retrohackingmania (Extra Mario Bros - SMB3 Mix)

Yujuuuuu, he desbloqueado el mundo secreto!

Y no he seguido, me lo guardo para mañana xD A ver si ha merecido la pena el curro de las monedicas y cometas...

Tras darle toda la vuelta al juego denuebo para conseguir las monedas, definitivamente la segunda mitad del juego es mucho mejor, siendo los mundos 3 y 4 las partes mas flojillas (World tenia que ser). Garacshee guord da best.

Aqui dejo un video del mundo 7 (Galaxy) para los indecisos:

[video=youtube]www.youtube.com/watch?v=snua-Zu4hvM[/video]

Y de paso, una entrevista que se le hizo al creador del juego hace un par de semanas (y que fue la razon por la que me he puesto a jugarlo). En Ingles, of course.

Interview with Captain Southbird - Super Mario Bros. 3mix

Many of us grew up being obssessed with particular video games and have little to show for it other than the enjoyment we experienced. That can't be said for Robert S. (aka Captain Southbird), whose childhood fascination with the NES classic Super Mario Bros. 3 led him to spend several years of his adult life disassembling the game and reassembling it into a brand new game he titled Super Mario Bros. 3Mix.

3Mix, which was released in 2014 (and can be found on ROMhacking.net, is a ROM hack of Super Mario Bros. 3 that maintains the general look and feel of the original but changes every aspect of it. It features new graphics, music, levels, and even gameplay mechanics. The game is a tribute to the Mario series and borrows all sorts of elements from other Mario titles. For instance, it features the carrot power-up from Super Mario Land 2, which turns the plumber into Bunny Mario, and the Boomerang Flower from Super Mario 3D Land. 3Mix even uses a "reverse gravity" mechanic to mimic Super Mario Galaxy's outer space-themed levels. Many of the early levels in the game are based on levels from other Mario games. The game also has plenty of original levels and new gamplay mechanics, such as Pianta characters (from Mario Sunshine) who help Mario by tossing him into the air so he can access normally out-of-reach locations.

As with the New Super Mario Bros. series, the goal of 3Mix isn't just to get to the end of each stage. The game also challenges the player to find 300 Star Coins which have been hidden throughout the game's dozens of levels and are necessary to challenge the secret final boss (whose identity we won't spoil).

Unlike most NES games (including the one it's based on), 3Mix is extremely user friendly. The game has three save files and allows the player to save at any time. The player can also access the Star Road via a menu whenever they are on the World Map, allowing them to return to any worlds they have visited. If the player has beaten a level, it's marked with a check. The player can also see how many Star Coins they are missing by standing on the level's space on the World Map.

While 3Mix won't win any awards for originality, it's a well-designed game that can hold its own against any official Mario release. If you're a fan of old school Mario games, go download the patch and give it a shot. But first, check out our interview with Robert S., the man behind the game.

What can you tell me about yourself?

I was born and raised in Pittsburgh though have spent some time living in Minneapolis and Atlanta for work reasons. Born in 1983, thus young enough to remember the NES's heyday pretty well, and plenty of kids at school were "cool" if they had "a Nintendo." I even remember a classmate with a leather jacket embroidered with a Mario and coins, possibly some kind of official merchandise from the time.

Honestly overall my video game playing days mostly ended right around when the original PlayStation came onto the scene. My childhood games were pretty much all the Super Mario Bros. games of the NES/SNES era, Mega Man, and the Sonic the Hedgehog series from the early to mid nineties. While Sonic pretty much got away from me after the "Radical nineties" era, Mario has remained true enough to himself that I still tend to play those titles (e.g. the New Super Mario Bros. series, Paper Mario, most definitely Mario Galaxy and Mario Kart). I have fringe nostalgia for some of the other classic series like Legend of Zelda or classic RPGs like Chrono Trigger and Secret of Mana, even though this was more something I watched my siblings play than something I ever really got into. Basically platformers and their derivatives have always been my heart and soul, with some exceptions here and there.

As for professional work, I've only done business computer application software development (like POS systems, advertiser's websites, and other stuff that bores me to even mention it). Basically I started doing amateur computer programming from about the age of 10 when my dad showed me the ropes, and I really wanted to get into video games in some capacity, but once the games went 3D, I found the math just went over my head, and I gave up on that dream, at least as a profession. Of course, what is old becomes new again, and the indie game world has proven that 2D is back in style. (And of course nowadays even the indie guys have access to things that didn't used to exist like Unity, so who knows.)

When did you first become aware of ROM hacking and how did you get into it?

It's hard to pinout exactly when I was "aware" of ROM hacking, or getting into it. In the vaguest sense, as a kid, I found that I could slightly dislodge the game cartridge (now known as "cartridge tilting") for the Atari 7800 version of Donkey Kong Jr. and gain invincibility plus sometimes become an "angel" (where Jr. turned a white color.) Maybe more to the point, the Game Genie is essentially a very primitive form of ROM hacking in the way it operates, and I was definitely one of those who took the Code Book's information seriously and tried to alter codes to get new effects. My biggest memory of that time was over the course of months spending the morning before school trying to discover what I called "fake levels" in Super Mario Bros. 3, which probably closest goes to what's well known now as the handful of present but unused levels in the game. Basically this amounted to tweaking a "World Start" GG code to any of the few hundred impossible values and hoping that the player started on an "enterable" glitch tile space that would actually lead me potentially to a new level. I occasionally would hit upon some types of glitched out materials but never really found anything significant. But then, this was hardly a scientific approach.

Perhaps further on track, I realized that ROM hacking was really a possible thing with the first NES emulator I came into contact with, which was able to edit the CHR-ROM graphics tiles (if available). That was both my first grasp into realizing how any of it worked as well as giving me an idea that one could willfully modify game cartridge software, that it was at its heart no more magical than any other computer software.

While I came across occasional hacks without understanding what they were (e.g., having an SMB ROM with a so-called "trainer" embedded in it), I think my first real significant hack that I had heard of is what is known as the Sonic 2 Delta project. At the time it was originally a hacking attempt that wanted to reinstate levels cut out of Sonic 2, though these days it exists in a far different form. But at that time, just seeing Sonic 2 being expanded beyond its normal bounds by actually adding content to a game (where I previously thought them to be inflexible to containing new content) truly showed me that with the right technical capacity, one could not only modify, but dramatically change existing game software.

Now to the heart of the matter, where this all really came together was when the site/community known as Sonic Retro released a thorough disassembly to Sonic 2, taking it back to its 68K source with lots of commentary and reasonable clarity. This was the first time I had witnessed ROM hacking go beyond from trying to manually edit bytes in a hex editor to truly being allowed to reprogram the game almost as good as if Sega had handed them the source code themselves. And yet this had been performed by folks outside the industry and likely too young to have possibly been working for Sega at the time Sonic 2 was originally created.

Can you tell me a little bit about what went into designing 3Mix? What motivated you to create it? How long did it take you? Did you design all the assembly hacks yourself? How did you plan out the levels?

3Mix itself sort of evolved organically. We really have to take it back a little bit to the Sonic Retro Sonic disassembly.

I've already alluded to the fact that SMB3 was my childhood fascination and I tried to use the Game Genie to get to a deeper level with it. The website TCRF that documents lost content had a great deal of SMB3 content, particularly the "lost levels" of SMB3. Also of great interest to me was the hints of lost bonus game varieties. Between my persistent interest in SMB3 from my childhood and being inspired by Sonic Retro's work, I decided I wanted SMB3 to get the same treatment - rip it apart top to bottom and produce a documented disassembly that would be "easy" to work with to create new SMB3 hacks. This took me about two years off and on to complete. The documentation on TCRF regarding the lost bonus games is now greatly bulked out mostly to my own efforts there.

But before releasing that, I figured I'd earned the right to be the first one to do something significant with it. I didn't really know what that was going to be. The first thing I started to do was implement a "reverse gravity" mode (which eventually of course evolved into the World 7 gimmick), and then, having had fun playing New Super Mario Bros. Wii, I wanted to add the concept of Star Coins to it. And since I now needed space to store currently acquired Star Coins and the flag pole end goal was "current" again, I figured I'd change the SMB3 goal cards to a flag pole. And that pretty much was the beginning of the idea of "Let's just implement various gimmicks from previous Mario games and see how they might play out in SMB3." The project was actually pretty far advanced before the name "3Mix" came along. It had come time for it to be released to the public in demo form and my original intent was to call it New Super Mario Bros. 3 (a play on the then-current NSMB Wii), but my brother came up with the name 3Mix (a play on "remix," obviously taking concepts from other Mario games and "remixing" them to SMB3 style) and it stuck.

The completion of 3Mix from beginning to end took roughly two years. There was of course on and off time as any hobby project, but once it started to snowball, it got easier and easier to make content for it. And of course if you spend enough time in the source it becomes a second language after time and you just know how to implement things, how to pull off the sprites, etc.

As should be made clear, I absolutely did all the ASM hacks myself. Since I did the entire disassembly first to learn how SMB3 worked internally, the hacks were simply application of that knowledge. For the most part, no one really knew of 3Mix until it was just out in the wild.

Once the concept of 3Mix had formed, the level designs pretty much followed suit. Obviously World 1 would be Mario 1, and World 2 would be Mario 2 (USA). In these worlds, they more or less were cloned as close as possible to existing level designs (occasionally with some choice deviation either due to gameplay differences or just to keep it interesting) to really give you a chance to ask "What if I had been playing this level in SMB3?"

Things got a little different after that as we left the NES realm. World 3 was the first to not exactly be a clone of a particular game, and it just absorbed the "ghost" elements of Super Mario Land 2 plus some nods to Luigi's Mansion. World 4 adopted Super Mario World and again could partially clone some levels, but there's still too great a difference at the core to be accurate, so they were more like "shallow adaptations." World 5 was a cobbled together desert world that used Super Mario Land stuff, SMB2 desert world stuff, etc.

World 6 is again perhaps where it starts to get particularly interesting because it intended to reference Mario Sunshine which was leaps and bounds ahead of the NES. So now more "unique" graphics were sucked in and really these level layouts were just of my imagination. I would look at a Mario Sunshine level to get an idea of some of the thematic stuff and then just build a level that sort of was based on the idea. It's pretty abstract but still seemed to be appreciated.

World 7 is naturally the star attraction of 3Mix. This is when the early "reverse gravity" idea really found its home; if we can make it dynamic, we can create a crude duplication of Mario snapping to planetoid gravitational forces. Obviously then the level designs followed Mario Galaxy's general "fantasy universe of tiny, often implausible planetoids" and this is how the levels were then constructed. Just to mix it up I'd bring in some other stuff like the Top Man tribe or the Supermassive Galaxy. (Truth be told, the latter actually had to do with I found I still had SMB3's "Giant World" stuff leftover and figured since it was there, might as well use it.)

World 8 was nothing real special. I had long ago decided that I like final levels to be "final exams," a basic revisit to past level themes you had already played. For 8-1 and 8-2 though, these were actually levels included in 3Mix's Two World Demo that I thought were too difficult to be where they were and I just shifted them out.

World Zero is the last real point of interest; it exists as a "bonus world" in 3Mix, although you get "taunted" by it early on via secret exits on even numbered worlds. While it may appear as some kind of creepy, dark, perhaps corrupted place, its real origins are an homage to my own childhood. It vaguely represents a favorite "invalid" world in SMB3 I would visit via the Game Genie, and while the "taunt" periphery levels are just "remixed" Mario 3 levels, the core levels of World Zero are actually mostly childhood drawings I had made of would-be new SMB3 levels finally brought to life. Everything is done in the theme of Super Paper Mario's Castle Bleck because, while it's hotly contested among Paper Mario fans, I actually really like it as being an early game that really tried to represent itself as a memory of Mario's platforming past. Earlier thoughts for 3Mix actually intended to explore Super Paper Mario locations, but I ultimately didn't go with it for reasons I don't remember. So World Zero represents my childhood with a slight nod of respect towards Super Paper Mario.

Have you done any hacks other than 3Mix?

I haven't yet done any other hacks besides 3Mix, though I have some ideas and done some miscellaneous research and tool development. I often get requests to add this or that to 3Mix or to port it to SNES as a Super Mario All-Stars hack, but that's not really my interest. 3Mix is pretty much exactly what I want it to be and I have no desire to really work on it anymore other than fixing major issues. I don't necessarily want to be known only as a "ROM hacker," especially since the Indie game market seems really appealing, but I'm pretty sure I'll be involved in another project eventually.

Since ROM hacking takes so much work, do you think there should be a way for hackers to get compensated for their work?

I'm going to assume by "compensated" we're referring to money. It would be great if there was a way to be compensated. I've had people ask if there was some way they could donate money for what I did with 3Mix. And not that I like tooting my own horn, but I really did a pretty amazing thing with 3Mix I think. I pretty much re-engineered it into a whole new game, and the praise for it is out there. This was a serious time investment, a large chunk of man-hours spent tearing the game down and rebuilding it. But touching upon the copyright law issue, I'd be too afraid of Nintendo striking me down should I take a single dollar for any of it. To be fair, I didn't invent Mario, so what right do I really have to sell Mario anyway? I suppose this is where I should realize there's something to me actually creating my own things from scratch rather than riding the success of someone else's creation. I think that's where a clear line shows that ROM hacking really should only ever be a hobby and not a job, as much as we might wish it could be.

What do you think the future of the ROM hacking community will look like?

I'm not really involved enough with them regularly to accurately predict their future, but from the periphery, I can say we've come into an age where the Internet has graced us both with better tools and debuggers than even the original hardware developers had and so much collaboration, whether intentional or incidental. Almost all of the old consoles have their "top secret" hardware spec docs leaked. (Dubious how much value those have to their parent companies anymore anyway.) We're actually right in the ideal time for anyone who wants to spend a little time learning a hardware platform to create amazing hacks. Like you have AtariAge that actually is focused on producing new physical carts for the Atari 2600. You have my disassembly of Super Mario Bros. 3 which should allow anyone to take the game in amazing new directions. (Check out what "DahrkDaiz" of Mario Adventure fame is doing with it.) Sonic Retro is busy making comparable disassemblies of the classic Sonic the Hedgehog games. I suppose eventually these old consoles will go the way of steam engine trains, but even steam engine trains still have love and support of a subset of the eternally nostalgic human race.

Are there any important points I haven't brought up?

I've noticed that with Sonic Retro making easy-to-use disassemblies of the eternally popular Sonic the Hedgehog games, we've been flooded with a ton of lackluster hacks usually just featuring new, unimaginative levels, tacky color palette changes, and sometimes awful, needless music instrumentation changes. There's also a prevalence of similarly boring Super Mario World hacks, often featuring ridiculous "Kaizo"-inspired level design that have no balance and are simply frustrating to play, probably impossible without the use of a software emulator with save states for most folks.

While ROM hacking just to make the game "do new things" is an art, game design is also an art, and it should not be ignored. I've played almost all of the 2D Mario games Nintendo has ever made, many several times, and I looked to see what about them made them good, made them fun, which I could apply to making 3Mix. Just recently I was watching a favorite video game streamer play some "bad" Mario hacks, and besides the "Kaizo" nature of some of them, another thing that stuck out was a dearth of power-ups, a core staple of what makes a Mario game "fun." I realize some people really do like these sort of ridiculously difficult hacks, but the majority of us like Mario for just being a casual, fun romp. It's perfectly okay for a Mario game to feature lots of power-ups and lightweight platforming. That's what makes them fun for the general audience.

I guess my point is, while it's exciting to be able to change levels, graphics, sounds, etc. in a game you hold dear, just remember if you want everyone to play and have fun with your end result, consider a few things. Your changes should bring something genuinely new to the experience - I shouldn't be just playing SMB 1-1 with a few coins repositioned and expect me to be enthralled with your hack. Just because you've added 20 loops to Green Hill Zone doesn't make your hack special.

If you want to make a hack that's truly memorable, it's going to take more time and effort than most folks are going to want to put into it. It might make sense to aim for a shorter game to produce a better quality experience, and that can be fine too. I don't expect everyone to make a 3Mix. This was a special combination of me being ridiculously passionate and also incidentally entering a massive shift in my life where I was relatively isolated for a while so I had nothing better to do. But if someone really puts time and consideration into their hack, which may include some difficulty ramping and other subtle features, it shows.
 
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Air Luigi

Air Luigi

Iluh Minaoh
Fortianitas
1.190
RE: Luiji's Retrohackingmania (Extra Mario Bros - SMB3 Mix)

Pos terminado al 100%

El proximo Mario sera el Adventure, no vaya a ser que Sovre tuviera razon y me arrepintiera, pero no le tengo mucha fe.

¿Alguna recomendacion Sovre?

No se si jugar uno de Zelda o Megaman ahora, mmm...
 
OP
Air Luigi

Air Luigi

Iluh Minaoh
Fortianitas
1.190
RE: Luiji's Retrohackingmania (Extra Mario Bros - SMB3 Mix)

De momento me he puesto con un MeJaman, mas que nada porque un Zelda me llevara mas tiempo... aunque de momento el hack de MejaMan esta barriendo el suelo conmigo xD Joer, me siento casual.

En hacks de Megaman estoy muy pez, hay alguno que os guste especialmente que no sea la kaka de Minus Infinity? Tengo varios en lista que suelen ser recomendados, pero ya digo, voy a ciegas a ver si encuentro uno que este totalmente a mi gusto. Con el que estoy ahora pinta bien (no es como MinusI que fue rechazo inmediato), pero los jefes son un dolor de huevos (estoy matandolos con megabuster, eso si, con arma correcta supongo que sera mucho mas facil, pero es que ha cambiado el orden y me he llevado owned cuando he visto que no funcionaba xd)
 
Fortianitas
130
RE: Luiji's Retrohackingmania (Extra Mario Bros - SMB3 Mix)

Si le gusta uno me avisa, que los megamans siempre me atraen si están bien hechos.
 
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Air Luigi

Air Luigi

Iluh Minaoh
Fortianitas
1.190
RE: Luiji's Retrohackingmania (Extra Mario Bros - SMB3 Mix)

Ya menganchao, me quedan 3 robots. Como 3 o 4 retrys me esta llevando cada nivel, pero es un subidon cuando completo uno xD Esta montado en base a las filosofias de MM 1&2, asi que juegaso les digo. Las armas nuevas son amor, y joder si ayudan, estoy usando los items a saco como no hacia en MM2. Este es el tipico juego que es mu chungo la primera partida, pero que cuando lo domine y me aprenda los niveles/estrategia correcta en cada punto me parecera asequible (Ecco style *o*). Mola tener que currarse cada nivel, los Megaman clasicos son muy faciles definitivamente.

Me he spoileado el orden correcto de robots, debo admitir, hacerlos con el megabuster es demasiado jarcor xD
 
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Air Luigi

Air Luigi

Iluh Minaoh
Fortianitas
1.190
RE: Luiji's Retrohackingmania (Extra Mario Bros - SMB3 Mix)

Dos partidas completadas al juego, y como esperaba, segun voy jugando mejor y aplicando las estrategias correctas la diversion se dispara *o* Con lo que me costaron los niveles normales ayer, y hoy ya me paseo xD Signo de gran Megaman. Me encanta cuando todo es util, es que es muy bueno el armamento.

Mañana hago la presentacion en sociedad.
 
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Air Luigi

Air Luigi

Iluh Minaoh
Fortianitas
1.190
RE: Luiji's Retrohackingmania (Extra Mario Bros - SMB3 Mix)



Rockman No Constancy (NES) - 2007
Hack de: Rock Man 2
Valoracion: 4/5 (Clasico)

Descarga: http://www.romhacking.net/hacks/321/ (El parche se aplica a la rom japonesa)

[video=youtube]www.youtube.com/watch?v=nzbsXClShQg[/video]

El hack japones mas famoso de Megaman 2 y por buenas razones, no decepciona. Si piensas que los juegos de NES estan chupados y te gusta que un Megaman te haga aprovechar tu inventario al maximo, este es tu juego. Puro oldschool tipo MM1-2-9, pero mas chungo.

Los robots y jefes son los mismos que en Megaman 2, pero sus patrones y ataques son diferentes, mas agresivos y rapidos. Cada nivel del juego tiene una nueva apariencia, musica y atmosfera unica, que va acorde a los robomasters.
*Ahora Air Man reina sobre un palacio flotante en el cielo donde soplan los vientos.
*El bosque de Wood Man ha sufrido una gran nevada donde las superficies resbaladizas abundan. (Y HAY MUÑECOS DE NIEVE CON LA CARA DE WILY xd)
*Heat Man domina un desierto donde los bloques y suelos falsos abundan.
*Flash Man descansa en una cueva con problemas de luz.
*Crash Man tiene un toque nostalgico a lo Megaman X con una carretera en ruinas a las afueras de la ciudad.
*Bubble Man es el rey de unas ruinas sumergidas donde la especial gravedad acuatica es como siempre la estrella. Y los pinchos, muchos pinchos y fosas *.*
*Quick Man con su caverna de hielo y rayitos rapidos everywhere hacen parecer la fase original una casualada.
*Y por ultimo, Metal Man es una especie de estacion subterranea donde tambien pasamos por un tunel de roca con goteras.



Una vez terminamos los niveles normales, esta vez atacamos la fortaleza de Wily por una entrada submarina en pleno silencio y tension :O Estos niveles son mucho mas dificiles que los normales, y un buen uso de las armas e items es esencial.

El diseño de niveles es exquisito, llevandonos al limite dentro de lo posible. Lo mas jodido es empezar a hacer camino, el juego intimida mucho al inicio cuando empiezas a probar niveles y no eres capaz de terminar ninguno xD Si llegas al jefe, te masacra fijo. Una vez consigues un par de armas y algun item (y vas conociendo los niveles), la cosa se empieza a suavizar. Los jefes por suerte son faciles si tienes el arma adecuada, pero el orden es diferente ya que las armas son diferentes.



Pero tras la pequeña barrera inicial, una vez empiezas a comprobar el potencial de las armas (son diox, espectaculares y dopadas), ves lo bien que esta diseñado el juego en torno a ellas, señal inequivoca de GRAN MEGAMAN. Solo el escudo (ahora es de hielo) y la habilidad para parar el tiempo son las mismas.
*Ahora cargar la habilidad de Heat Man es igual a Megabuster, lol. Destroza puertas y arrasa con los enemigos.
*Con la habilidad de Air Man lanzas varias hojas afiladas de gran poder que se dispersan hacia los lados-arriba.
*El arma de Crash Man es awesome, lanzamos una bomba al suelo que crea una onda expansiva a nuestro alrededor, una de las que mas uso, y dura...
*Bubble Man ahora nos aporta unas cuchillas que lanzamos con un angulo alto hacia arriba, y que luego ruedan a gran velocidad, tambien duran mucho, otra de las mejores armas...
*Nuestras queridas Metal Blade estan mucho mejor balanceadas... gastan mucha mas energia, pero son mas poderosas. Lanzarlas es una nueva experiencia, ya que hay que apuntar al lado contrario y el angulo es diferente o_O Claves para avanzar en el juego.
*Y por ultimo, con Quick Man dejas estacionadas unas llamas de fuego, que tras unos segundos viajan rapido hacia delante.
Solo deberias usar el buster practicamente al inicio del juego. Los enemigos aguantan mas tiros que antaño, son mas rapidos, disparan mas... pero si usas las armas correctas, puedes acabar con ellos de un solo tiro, y pasar partes complicadas de los niveles de forma sencilla. ¿Pensabas que Item 3 es practicamente inutil en MM2? En RnC es imprescindible en ciertas partes. Usa Item 1-2 para pasar las partes de plataformeo mas jodidas. He aprendido cosas nuevas de las fisicas que no sabia. Lo unico que hubiera faltado para que el sistema fuera redondo es que Time Stopper se pudiera detener o poder caminar con el escudo de Wood Man.



En este juego se aprende a leches, no esperes completar un nivel a la primera... cuanto mas lo juegas, mas divertido es, se vuelve segunda naturaleza y booooom... es realmente agradable pasearte por los niveles usando las armas con maestria y sin problema tras haber sufrido lo indecible el dia anterior, subidon les digo.

Eso si, probablemente no hubiera tenido paciencia para amaestrar el juego si no hubiera sabido de antemano las debilidades de cada jefe, pasarselos con megabuster quitando dos o tres es casi de locos, asi que dejo la secuencia:

Metal-> Quick->Wood->Heat->Air->Flash->Crash->Bubble->Metal

Metal Man es quiza el nivel mas facil para comenzar, tanto el nivel como el jefe son asequibles con buster. Pero si empiezas por ahi, tardaras un poco en tener los items y otras de las mejores armas, asi que puede merecer la pena hacer el esfuerzo y batir primero a Air Man o Heat Man por ejemplo. Si te preguntas como es posible cambiar la secuencia sin perder la coherencia, el juego justifica esto bien (por ejemplo) haciendo que Wood Man ahora tenga ataques de hielo en su bosque nevado, asi luego Heat Man lo disfruta.

Los nuevos temas crean una gran atmosfera y encajan perfectamente. Son muy curiosos porque muchos son versiones 8 bit muy conseguidas de videojuegos de generaciones posteriores, como The King of Fighters. Algunos son de Megaman (X-Zero), otros no.

En definitiva, un hack muy epico dedicado a todos los que se han petado los clasicos de NES mil veces y buscan revivir la gloria de un Megaman oldschool, con las filosofias de los dos primeros. Si tienes un poco de paciencia hasta adaptarte al juego y conocer sus intringulis, Rockman No Constancy es el Megaman Clasico mas divertido de dominar y jugar. Preparate para morir, casual.

[video=youtube]www.youtube.com/watch?v=IT0K7BLKZIw[/video]
 
OP
Air Luigi

Air Luigi

Iluh Minaoh
Fortianitas
1.190
RE: Luiji's Retrohackingmania (Extra Mario Bros - SMB3 Mix - Rockman no Constancy)

[video=youtube]www.youtube.com/watch?v=x-JUqTJnaJY[/video]

Pero que juegaso joer, la cuarta partida aun mejor que la tercera xD

No me habia dado cuenta hasta ahora de lo de la puerta sin acceso en el nivel de Flash Man, ahora lo del nivel final encaja...

Es que son epicos todos los niveles... mucho amore. Todo el gameplay hace click de forma perfecta. A diferencia de MM2 original, los recuperadores de vida/energia se regeneran siempre tras palmar.
 
Fortianitas
4
RE: Luiji's Retrohackingmania (Extra Mario Bros - SMB3 Mix - Rockman no Constancy)

pobre luigi.

El fuerte de rockman no constancy son los hazards, conceptos fijos en cada nivel, y mas o menos se enfocan unicamente en ellos.

Conceptos mas no necesariamente ejecucion, pero igual creo que estan bien.
Y mas o menos porque la mitad del nivel es ambientacion, y es ahi donde pega fuerte... en teoria, al final no puedo sino pensar en zero.

Los jefes dan lastima, son "dificiles" pero solo porque son rapidos, en realidad su patron es muy simplon, predecible como no teneis idea, y de todos solo heatman tiene algo que decir, que su patron consiste en ponerte en peligro para terminar la pelea mas rapido xD

Conclusion: MM3 Wly Stage, pero bien echos.

El juego funciona por lo cortos de sus niveles, algunos duran 1 minuto y siendo malo jugando.
Si eres bueno te aburriras, que es lo que me paso a mi, dificultad de mentiras.

"A diferencia de MM2 original, los recuperadores de vida/energia se regeneran siempre tras palmar. "
xDDDD

"¿Alguna recomendacion Sovre?"
Tienes vidas infinitas y las monedas son para comprar items, creo que con eso basta :B
 
OP
Air Luigi

Air Luigi

Iluh Minaoh
Fortianitas
1.190
RE: Luiji's Retrohackingmania (Extra Mario Bros - SMB3 Mix - Rockman no Constancy)

Es que si los jefes pudieran ser nuevos seria el mejor Megaman ever, es lo unico que le falta para redondear la fiesta. Pero es comprensible, en 2007 el hacking de Megaman no estaba tan avanzado, a mi me gusta lo que hizo con los jefes del Castillo especialmente (Dragoncito con gafas de sol xD). Solo Megaman 9 habia conseguido centrarme en un Megaman a saco durante mas de 3 dias probando diferentes tipos de avance y estrategias. Tiene mucho merito teniendo en cuenta que solo usa material de programacion propio de MM2, pero lo explota y le da un giro en direcciones que no podria pensar. No tendra asm y tantas features como Minus Infinity, pero como juego y experiencia le da mil patadas, que es lo que interesa. Aunque un dia de estos decidire pasarme MI, me gustara y me sentire mal, asi que no deberia decirlo tan alto. Bueh, maz da xD Si al menos tuviera musica decente, pero es que... yo sin sonido no se jugar.

Volvere a echar partidas a menudo a RnC.

Ahora si a por Zelda. Empezando el hack, no se como nunca me habia liado a jugar este, promete mucho...
 
OP
Air Luigi

Air Luigi

Iluh Minaoh
Fortianitas
1.190
RE: Luiji's Retrohackingmania (Extra Mario Bros - SMB3 Mix - Rockman no Constancy)

Primera impresion: Bah, solo son graficos cambiaooos
Tras 5 segundos de gameplay: Best hack ever

Btw, el overworld del juego que estoy empezando, que hypeeee:

 
Fortianitas
109
RE: Luiji's Retrohackingmania (Extra Mario Bros - SMB3 Mix - Rockman no Constancy)

hack de Zelda? traicionas a setase
 
OP
Air Luigi

Air Luigi

Iluh Minaoh
Fortianitas
1.190
RE: Luiji's Retrohackingmania (Extra Mario Bros - SMB3 Mix - Rockman no Constancy)

Bueno, revelo que estoy jugando "Zelda Challenge: Outlands"

Juegaso, me esta sorprendiendo, no mucho que ver con Zelda 1 para bien y para mal, es una nueva experiencia completa con un desarrollo unico.

Tengo Kokiri Sword (segunda espada), la carta, carne, bumerang, vela, balsa... dos hadas (son las piezas de trifuerza). He completado L1-2, tengo L3 a medias, he encontrado L4... El desarrollo es muy curioso, el mundo es como un gran puzzle y viajar de una mazmorra a otra es clave, no puedes completarlas del tiron xD Totalmente enganchado, que gustazo es siempre empezar un Zelda clasico a ciegas. Me gustaria que tuviera port a ZC para evitar algunas ralentizaciones y poder cambiar los items rapido. A veces pulso los botones L-R que no existen, lol.

Oh, y he encontrado la vara de somaria (wand, vamos), pero parece que necesito tener muchos corazones para llevarmela...

No he encontrado ni un solo contenedor de corazon en el campo aun, joer xD
 
OP
Air Luigi

Air Luigi

Iluh Minaoh
Fortianitas
1.190
RE: Luiji's Retrohackingmania (Extra Mario Bros - SMB3 Mix - Rockman no Constancy)

Ahora si joder GOGOGOGOGOGOGO, cayó la tunica azul, brazalete, arco, expansiones de bombas y varios contenedores... mucho mejor. Suficiente por hoy.

Los cuatro primeros niveles ko, a explorar todo lo que me queda y a dar con las mazmorras restantes.

Estoy frio de cojones, me ha costado, se ha notado que no jugaba ZC desde febrero -.-
 
OP
Air Luigi

Air Luigi

Iluh Minaoh
Fortianitas
1.190
RE: Luiji's Retrohackingmania (Extra Mario Bros - SMB3 Mix - Rockman no Constancy)

PERO QUE JUEGAZO POR DIOS!

Han caido los niveles 5-6-7, tengo espada maestra, libro, vela roja, varita, todos los contenedores de corazon (menos el del nivel 8).

Si esto fuera una quest de ZC de 1.90 (version del año 2002 o asi, cuando solo podias editar Z1 puro), seria mi favorita. MUY BIEN HECHA. Las mazmorras son dios, y he disfrutado encontrandolas como nunca jamas en cualquier mod de tipo Z1. Me encanta la logica de este tio, es muy satisfactorio avanzar en el juego y figurarse las cosas. Normal que los cartuchos especiales del juego tuvieran tanto exito. No se como he estado tantos años sin probar este mod.

Probablemente traduzca el manual a español.

Y la second quest va a caer seguro, en cuanto termine la primera.

Al principio me quede un poco frio al ver que no eran exactamente las filosofias de Z1, pero el tipo consiguio reinventarlo y hacer algo igual de bueno y satisfactorio con sus propias ideas

SI SEÑOR, CHAPEAU.

Btw, esto confirma que Z1>ALTTP. Esperad verlo en el top 3 de mi top sien tras La-Mulana y Ecco :( Si me paso la vida jugando Z1 y sus derivados de una forma u otra (ZC), es que es el mejor Zelda y no hay nada mas que desir. Juego infinito.
 
Fortianitas
0
RE: Luiji's Retrohackingmania (Extra Mario Bros - SMB3 Mix - Rockman no Constancy)

'Air Luigi' pid='357238' dateline='1443929841' dijo:
Al principio me quede un poco frio al ver que no eran exactamente las filosofias de Z1
 
Osea que es Lineal ?